Home > VMware, vSphere5 > Configuring Dump Collector & Syslog on ESXi 5.0

Configuring Dump Collector & Syslog on ESXi 5.0

What is the usage of Dump Collector ?

A core dump is the state of working memory in the event of host failure and by default is saved to local disk.The Dump Collector enables us to redirect ESXi host core dumps onto a network server. Installation of the Core dump server is straight forward. Dump Collector comes as part of the vCenter Server 5.0 Installation media and we have the option of either installing the Dump Collector separately or integrate Dump Collector with vCenter Server.

Configuration of ESXi host for Dump Collector

  • Download and Install vSphere Power CLI
  • Use the below command to verify the Current Dump Collector Settings

esxcli –server–username root system coredump network get

  • Use the below command to configure Core Dump Collector

esxcli –server–username root system coredump network set –interface-name–server-ipv4–server-port

  • Once configured , We can enable Dump Collector using the below command

esxcli –server–username root system coredump network set –enable true

What is the usage of Syslog Server ?

Syslog Server helps us to capture and move ESXi host logs on to a Network server. Syslog Server also comes as part of vCenter 5.0 Server Installation media . Again we have couple of options for the Installation wherein we can either go for a Separate Server or go in for a vCenter integrated Syslog server.

Configuration of ESXi host for Syslog Server

  • Select the host that needs to have Syslog Server configured.
  • Navigate to Configuration –>Advanced Settings
  • Specify the IP Address of the Syslog Server in the below format under the parmater “Syslog.global.logHost” available under Syslog.

udp://:

  • Please allow Syslog in the ESXi firewall by navigating to Configuration –> SecurityProfile
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  1. DK
    January 11, 2012 at 1:02 am

    Thanks for the post. One note: “Download and Install vSphere Power CLI” should read “Download and Install vSphere CLI”, which is not the same thing.

  1. October 12, 2011 at 1:31 pm
  2. July 12, 2015 at 5:45 pm

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